EEAC documents

The EEAC Working Groups often publish studies; memo’s or session outcome letters. You can find these documents on this page.

EEAC Annual Plan: a Framework for Action

The EEAC is a European network of advisory councils that advice their (sub)national governments and parliaments on issues related to sustainable development and the environment. The EEAC Network aims to enrich the advice that individual advisory bodies can give to their governments and parliaments, to bridge the gap between scientific knowledge and policymaking and to connect the work of the (sub)national councils and the European policy level with regard to the environment and sustainable development. To achieve this aims, the board of the EEAC Network presents an Annual Plan. The Plan includes a framework for action; a list of thematic areas of common interest; proposed exchange activities and a tentative agenda.

EEAC Annual Plan: a Framework for Action

Relationship between the transition to a circular economy and other major transitions

In prelude to the EEAC Annual Conference in Berlin, members of the EEAC Working Group on a Circular Economy gathered to discuss the relationship between the transition to a circular economy and other major transitions. After setting the scene, the session continued with the presentation of two concrete cases: (i) the circular economy transition in relation to the transition in the mobility and transport sector and (ii) the circular economy transition in relation to the food production and consumption transition. Through this letter, Nicole van Buren shares a mainline summary of the matters discussed during the working group session.

Relationship between the transition to a circular economy and other major transitions

The social-economic consequences of the phase out of old energy regimes

Decarbonisation, and therefore the process of phasing out coal, will not be driven primarily by market forces, as is the case in the usual dynamics of structural change in market economies (i.e. mobile phones).1 Political decisions are required to enhance and guide the phase-out process. The EEAC Working Group on Energy and Climate Change organised a seminar in which the socioeconomic consequences and the role of government in the coal phase-out process were highlighted. In the outcome letter Folmer de Haan touches upon the general situation regarding the role of coal and the coal phase-out process. Special attention will be paid to countries like Germany, the United Kingdom and Poland. In the second part of the letter, the situation surrounding terminated coal mining in the Netherlands is described and lessons learned are shared. The third part of the letter includes several preliminary recommendations with regard to a timely and just coal phase-out process.

The social-economic consequences of the phase out of old energy regimes

The Role of Science in Strengthening an Integrated Policy Approach to our Seas and Oceans II

An effective implementation of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) in Europe and the achievement of Aichi Target 111 at the global level will be crucial to ensuring sustainable use of the seas, which is the core message of SDG 14. This requires deploying an ecosystem approach and emphasizing ecosystem health, which can be expressed through the concept of Good Environmental Status (GES), established by the MSFD. GES is to be assessed for all marine environments in Europe, regardless of their protection status, while Aichi Target 11 is aimed at the conservation of 10 percent of coastal and marine areas worldwide. Therefore, Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have a twofold function: as key instruments to achieve Aichi Target 11, and as excellent locations for testing and improving GES measuring, monitoring and reporting. Although European politicians have often underlined the importance of sustainable seas and oceans and are currently proposing the GES approach to the global community, it seems that neither scientists nor MPA managers have sufficient means at their disposal to carry out proper GES measurements, monitoring or reporting. This EEAC mainline summary only touches upon the surface of an in-depth and complementary knowledge exchange between the attending parties.

The Role of Science in Strengthening an Integrated Policy Approach to our Seas and Oceans II

The EU Water Framework Directive: Results to date and outlook for the future

In order to fulfil its obligation to review the Water Framework Directive (WFD), the European Commission published its evaluation roadmap in October 2017. As part of this evaluation process and in preparation for the review process in 2019, the EEAC Working Group on Fresh Water Affairs dedicated its latest round table session to possible explanations for the incomplete success of the WFD so far, as well as perspectives on the future of the Directive. In order to discuss this topic, over 25 experts at the EU, national and sub-national level gathered in Brussels on 26 June 2018. This document contains a mainline summary of the debate and offers a set of preliminary recommendations originating from the round table session.

The EU Water Framework Directive: Results to date and outlook for the future

Twenty-five years on: Progressing the sustainable development and environmental agenda in the EU and the role of the EEAC network

By any measure, the EU is at the forefront of both thinking and action on the environmental and sustainable development agenda and has actively built this position over the last quarter century. In this paper, David Baldock reviews the period from 1992 until the present. He reflects on some of the major themes and concepts, drivers and constraints, and the players involved. Most visible amongst those players are of course the European institutions, national and regional governments, NGOs and lobbies. Of special interest, however, is an informal network first established in 1993: the European Environment and Sustainable Development Advisory Councils (EEAC).

Twenty-five years on: Progressing the sustainable development and environmental agenda in the EU and the role of the EEAC network

A new science-policy-society interface for the 2030 Agenda: the role of European Advisory Councils on the Environment and Sustainable Development

The implementation of the 2030 Agenda at the national, sub-national and local level requires a strong alliance between governments, a broad variety of stakeholders and the scientific community. The existing national and sub-national advisory councils on the environment and sustainable development play a strategic role as advisors to governments and parliaments worldwide in terms of agenda setting and knowledge dissemination. Above all, these advisory councils have a tangible, long-standing and successful role as interface between policy, society and science. This document contains an analysis of the way the advisory councils on sustainable development contribute to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. It includes background information combined with some examples from the advisory councils gathered in the EEAC Network, with special attention to their contribution to a renewed interface between society, science and policy making.

A new science-policy-society interface for the 2030 Agenda: the role of European Advisory Councils on the Environment and Sustainable Development

Europe goes circular: outlining the implementation of a circular economy in the European area

Due to its complexity and novelty, no blueprint is currently available for the implementation of a circular economy. Consequently, sharing knowledge between the various stakeholders is of the utmost importance. With this document, the EEAC Network Working Group on circular economy is aiming to contribute to the process of knowledge exchange, not only by providing concise updates on the implementation of a circular economy (including examples at the European, national and regional level), but also by sharing information on the role and the opinions of the member councils of the EEAC Network regarding the implementation of a circular economy in their respective country or region. The document includes an analysis of and opinions on policy initiatives relating to the circular economy in ten European countries and regions. These ten countries and regions all have an advisory council that is a member of the EEAC Network. This document is not intended to present an exhaustive study, but should instead be regarded as a concise overview of the status quo regarding the circular economy in different European countries and regions. The aim of the document is to serve as a useful source of information, and to provide an overview of opinions on the implementation of a circular economy from the perspective of environment and sustainable development advisory councils.

Europe goes circular: outlining the implementation of a circular economy in the European area